How To Make An Industrial Serving Tray

How To Make An Industrial Serving Tray Woodworking

How to make an industrial serving tray is bookmark about Woodworking bookmarked by lee with ID 12858688197 was uploaded on 20-03-2019 and has been viewed 332,507 times.

Pipe and Barnwood This industrial serving tray is constructed of vintage oak barn wood and trimmed with black iron handles.Hardwood pegs add a touch of hand-wrought charm.If you can operate a saw and drill, you can make this industrial serving tray in few hours.

Materials Needed to Make this Industrial Serving Tray 1 Barnwood board: 9-1/2" wide x 1" thick x 10' long (2) 3/4" black iron pipes, 8" long (4) 3/4" black iron floor flanges (4) 3/4" black iron elbows (16) #8 slotted steel wood screws (1) 3/4" #8 wood scr*w (2) 1/2" hardwood plugs TSP, salt, vinegar, hydrogen peroxide Wood glue Stain Spray polyurethane Can polyurethane Tools Needed for Your Industrial Serving Tray Table saw (or circular saw with straightedge guide) Radial saw Carpenter's square Biscuit joiner (optional) Orbital sander with 120-grit disks Drill with 1/8" bit 1/2" sp*d* bit Hammer Phillips screwdriver Slotted-tip screwdriver Wood clamps Flush-cut saw Soap or candle 220-grit sandpaper Approximate Cost: $45 plus lumber Inspect the Board We are working with a single board of white oak, reclaimed from a barn in Minnesota that was destroyed by a tornado.

If you plan to use authentic barnwood for your industrial serving tray, be sure to carefully inspect the boards for nails and remove them.Make sure the wood is sound throughout, and not rotted and powdery.

If there is paint on one side of the board, assume that it is lead-based.Dust from lead-based paint is toxic, so you should not sand paint from the board.Using the instructions in "How to Remove Lead Paint Safely," scrape off any loose paint.

When it's time to apply a finish, just brush on a topcoat to that side.Whether it's the top or bottom of the serving tray is up to you and the effect you're going for.Square the End Use a carpenter's square to make a perpendicular cut on one end.

This gives you a baseline so the rest of your cuts can be square.Cut the Pieces We were able to get all the necessary pieces for our industrial serving tray from a 9-1/2".x 10' board.If you're working with a similar size board, cut the pieces out as shown, being careful to preserve the naturally distressed edges on most of the cuts.

You should end up with the following lengths: Two 4-1/2" x 26" boards, each with one natural edge One 4-1/2" x 26" board with clean edges Two 3-1/2" x 13-3/4" boards, each with one natural edge Ripping long boards is much easier with table saw! If you don't have one yet, see "Best Portable Table Saw Reviews" before you buy.

Arrange the Boards Arrange the three 4-1/2" boards as shown.The board with the clean-cut edges goes in the middle.Barnwood boards may be warped and uneven, so experiment to find the order that works best.

If possible, keep the most characteristic, beautiful texture on the same side.That will be the top of your industrial serving tray.Mark the Joins If you're using a biscuit joiner, make a mark every few inches across the boards where the biscuits will go.

If you don't have biscuit joiner, see these instructions on edge joining with glue.Cut the Slots Cut the biscuit slots at each mark.If you're not familiar with biscuit joiners, see this great article on how to use one.

Insert the Biscuits Dip the biscuits into wood glue and insert them into the slots on one side of the pair of boards that you will be joining.Apply a thin layer of glue along that board's edge.You'll want to be sure there's no glue on visible wood, so see this info on how to apply glue and clean away the excess.

Clamp Tightly Together Put the boards together and clamp firmly.Wood scraps on the end will help keep the boards level and prevent marks from the clamps.Let the glue dry for 24 hours.See these tips on how to clamp like a champ.

Smooth the Wood Depending on your tastes and the condition of the board, you could skip this step and simply seal the rough barnwood once the pieces are attached.(Remember, if your barnwood is painted, it should not be sanded.

) We are going for a smoother, more hand-worked appearance for our industrial serving tray, so we're using 120-grit disks on an orbital sander to remove the oxidized surface and smooth away splinters.Hate sanding? Here are some ideas on how to get through the job faster.

But Keep Some Texture We don't want to lose all that beautiful character, though, so we're careful not to sand off the saw marks and the other natural distressing characteristic of the industrial style.

Position the Top Boards Place the 3-1/2" x 13-3/4" boards perpendicularly on the top surface of your industrial serving tray, keeping the clean cut edges to the outside.Make sure they are flush on the top, bottom and side edges.

Find the center of the board, measuring side-to-side and lengthwise, then drill a 3/4" deep hole with a 1/8" drill bit.Drill a Countersink for the Peg Use a 1/2" sp*d* bit to drill a 1/4" deep hole in that spot.

Attach the Top Boards Lightly glue the underside of the boards, then attach them using a 3/4" #8 wood screw.Here's how to drive screws perfectly.Clamp Overnight Clamp the top boards to the industrial serving tray.

Clean off the excess glue.Allow the glue to dry at least overnight before removing the clamps.Clean the Iron Pipe and Fittings Use TSP (trisodium phosphate) to clean the pipe fittings.This will help str*p off the waxy coating often found on black iron pipes.

Rinse thoroughly and dry by hand.TSP is also great for cleaning woodwork prior to repainting.See more tips on how to paint a room fast.Corrode the Scr*w Heads In keeping with the vintage, industrial look, use steel slotted screws instead of Phillips head screws.

To avoid a shiny, new appearance, soak the screws at least overnight in a solution of vinegar, salt and hydrogen peroxide.If the scr*w heads are resisting corrosion, buff them lightly with fine-grit sandpaper, then spritz them with the salt, vinegar and hydrogen peroxide solution, allowing them to air dry.

Repeat if needed.Position the Handles Assemble the handles and position them on each top board, centering side-to-side and lengthwise.Make sure you rotate the fl*ng* so the holes are accessible with a screwdriver.

Mark and drill the scr*w holes using a 1/8" drill bit for the #8 wood screws you'll use later.Tip: You may want to mark the underside of the flanges to indicate which handle goes on which side of the industrial serving tray.

Seal the Handles Lightly coat the handles with a satin polyurethane spray to give them a consistent soft shine and protect the metal from corrosion.Two light coats are better than one heavy one, which could cause drips.

Peg the Holes Put a drop of glue inside the holes and tap a hardwood plug into each.Allow the glue to dry.If the plug protrudes above the board, cut it flush with a flat serrated blade, such as a flush-cut saw.

You can find hardwood plugs at most hardware stores.If you'd like the pegs to blend in with the surrounding board, use plugs cut from your project scraps and line up the grain.Here's how to make decorative wood plugs.

Distress the Clean Edges Use a wood rasp to roughen the clean edges of the top boards on your industrial serving tray.If you're working with new boards from a lumber store, now's the time to add distressing to give your serving tray a vintage look.

You'll find several interesting techniques for aging wood here, including alternatives to staining.Final Sanding Smooth the rasped edges and anywhere else on your industrial serving tray that might still have splinters.

Keep in mind that the tray may be placed on a bedspread or upholstered ottoman, so pay particular attention to the bottom side and sand down any areas that might catch on fabric.Choose a Stain Color Use scraps for testing stain colors.

Remember that the surface texture and topcoat (varnish, polyurethane, etc.) can alter the final appearance, so be sure test on sanded scraps and apply the topcoat before making your decision.Here's more on how to get the stain color you want.

Apply the Stain The good news is that a rustic, industrial serving tray like this looks better when it's not perfect, so don't sweat the staining.We used one coat of a water-based stain from General Finishes called Antique Oak.

Just brush it on and wait a few minutes before wiping it off with a rag.Let the stain dry for 6 to 8 hours.Here's more info on staining wood.Finish with a Topcoat We applied two coats of Minwax Fast-Drying Polyurethane in a Clear Satin sheen, with a light hand-sanding using 220-grit paper in between coats.

Always stir polyurethane well before using—never shake it, as that can cause bubbles.Here are more tips on how to get a smooth polyurethane finish.Screw in the Handles It's easy to accidentally str*p slotted screws, especially when working with hardwoods.

And if your scr*w threads are rusty, they'll be even more difficult to drive into the wood.A little bar soap or candle wax in the threads will make it easier.Want more tips like that? See "15 Revolutionary Techniques for Driving Screws.

" Enjoy! Your finished serving tray will be a solid, beautiful statement of industrial style that will last for years to come...

Read More →

Disclaimer: images, articles or videos on this website sometimes come from various other media sources. Copyright is fully held by the source. If there are problems related to this, you can contact us on this page.
Bookmark ID: 12858688197

How to make an industrial serving tray is just one of the many collections of bookmark on this website. There are approximately 4362 posts that exist in our database associated with this article. Here are the details of "how to make an industrial serving tray" article:

Category:
Title:
Image URL:
Post URL:

This is a article related to how to make an industrial serving tray, there are approximately 4362 bookmark related to this woodworking category. Please see the details below and click on the title for more information..

How To Make An Industrial Serving Tray Woodworking 150 x 100

How To Make An Industrial Serving Tray

Pipe and Barnwood This industrial serving tray is constructed of vintage oak barn wood and trimmed with black iron handles.Hardwood pegs add a touch of hand-wrought charm.If you can operate a saw and drill, you can make this industrial serving tray in few hours.Materials Needed to Make this Industrial Serving ... How to make an industrial serving tray is bookmark about Woodworking bookmarked by herman with ID 12858688197 was uploaded on 20-03-2019 and has been viewed 332,507 times.

How To Make A Wooden Chopping Board And Serving Tray Woodworking Projects 150 x 100

How To Make A Wooden Chopping Board And Serving Tray ...

Looking for a satisfying woodworking project? Make this beautiful maple and walnut cutting board/serving tray.Simple enough that you can start in the morning, then finish it in the afternoon How to make a wooden chopping board and serving tray is post about Woodworking Projects bookmarked by frederick with ID 12935364967 was uploaded on 15-01-2019 and has been viewed 212,930 times.

How To Make An Edge To Edge Glue Joint Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Make An Edge To Edge Glue Joint

Learn how to make an edge to edge joint, just one of the nine essential joints you should consider for your project.WOOD magazine's Craig Ruegsegger shows you not only how to make the joint, but why this joint might be the best choice for your project How to make an edge to edge glue joint is article about Woodworking How To bookmarked by curtis with ID 1910711239 was uploaded on 22-03-2019 and has been viewed 305,296 times.

How To Make An Upper Cabinet Base Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Make An Upper Cabinet Base

Learn how to make an upper cabinet base This is just one element of a complete series on how to make simple face-frame cabinets.In this episode, WOOD magazine's Kevin Boyle lays down the building blocks for making the box.Watch the other videos to catch how to make the face frames ... How to make an upper cabinet base is post about Woodworking How To bookmarked by justin with ID 1413264575 was uploaded on 31-01-2019 and has been viewed 424,677 times.

How To Make An Upper Cabinet Face Frame Woodworking How To 150 x 100

How To Make An Upper Cabinet Face Frame

Learn how to make an upper cabinet face frame.This is just one element of a complete series on how to make simple face-frame cabinets.In this episode, WOOD magazine's Kevin Boyle walks you through simple steps to create your face frame.With a few joinery tricks you'll be knocking them out like ... How to make an upper cabinet face frame is post about Woodworking How To bookmarked by tom with ID 1864579261 was uploaded on 17-02-2019 and has been viewed 101,782 times.

How To Make A Serving Tray With Breadboard Ends Craft Show Projects 150 x 100
How To Make A Serving Tray With Breadboard Ends

Step by step process on how to make a serving tray with through stub tenon breadboard ends out of padauk and maple How to make a serving tray with breadboard ends is bookmark about Craft Show Projects bookmarked by billy with ID 1194438278 was uploaded on 03-04-2019 and has been viewed 401,446 times.

How To Make A Bar Top Serving Tray With Wine Corks Shop Blog 150 x 100
How To Make A Bar Top Serving Tray With Wine ...

I recently finished a fun serving tray project with shop scraps.It features a decorative bottom covered with a bar top finish.You can pretty much build this to any dimensions you'd like, but take into account how deep your tray needs to be to accommodate whatever you use to decorate the ... How to make a bar top serving tray with wine corks is article about Shop Blog bookmarked by bob with ID 11394145040 was uploaded on 07-01-2019 and has been viewed 30,961 times.